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Loophole in CLL Treatment

Published: 2018-01-04 |

Source: Rockefeller University Press

A team of researchers in Italy and Austria has determined that a drug approved to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may be less effective in a particular subset of patients. The study, which will be published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that ibrutinib has a diminished capacity to delocalize and kill tumor cells expressing an adhesive protein called CD49d, but combining ibrutinib treatment with drugs that block CD49d activation could prevent the tumor cells from sheltering in lymphoid organs. Ibrutinib reallocates CLL cells from lymph nodes into the blood by inhibiting Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key enzyme in the B cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway.

BCR signaling promotes the survival and differentiation of normal healthy B cells in several ways, including by activating and adhesion receptor VLA-4, which attaches B cells to other supportive cells within lymph nodes. One of the subunits of VLA-4, CD49d, is highly expressed in about 40% of CLL patients. These patients tend to have poorer outcomes than patients that do not express CD49d, but the role of VLA-4 in CLL is unclear.

A team of researchers led by Antonella Zucchetto and Valter Gattei of the CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute in Italy and Tanja Nicole Hartmann of the Paracelsus Medical University in Salzburg, Austria found that BCR signaling can activate VLA-4 in CD49d-expressing CLL cells, thereby enhancing the cells' adhesiveness. Even though ibrutinib treatment impaired BCR signaling in these cells, it was unable to fully hinder the pathway from activating VLA-4 and enhancing cell adhesion.

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